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The Law Firm of

JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL, pc

"Exploring the Boundaries
 
of Your Business." 

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In NEW YORK
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& NEW JERSEY

Call:

+1 (646) 470-2729

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In JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA
& Other GCC Jurisdictions:


Khalil Khazindar Law Firm
in Association with
JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL pc
Ammar Commercial Center

Al Murjan Street (off of King Abdul Aziz Street), Office # 202
P.O. Box 157,  Jeddah  21411
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
+966 (2) 4204763 (p)
+966 (2) 4204729 (f)
www.khazindarlaw.com
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E-Mail: 

info@huflaw.com

Office Hours:  By Appointment Only

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  • Investing in Saudi Arabia

    Jason Huf has, for almost 20 years, centered the focus of his professional work on the Middle East.  Furthering economic development, including and especially increased Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), have been helpful in generating conditions giving rise to a broader, more self-sustaining, increasingly cosmopolitan - but still an authentically Arab and Islamic - middle class in the Gulf region.  The associated societal changes have been fundamental to addressing dynamics that need to be addressed if the exciting Vision 2030 reforms initiated by the Saudi Crown Prince, HRH Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz al Saud are to fully succeed.

    Some of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's (KSA) domestic problems have, in the past, become problems that impact the United States and other parts of the world.  Mr. Huf is proud that his work and the work of other Business Law practitioners in the region have constituted a small piece of a small piece of a tremendous puzzle, the resolution of which can be of significant benefit to our ever-shrinking global village.

    But there are other, more immediately practical, reasons to invest in Saudi Arabia.  Mr. Firoz Mohammed, our Senior Legal Consultant in Jeddah - a city in the Western Province (an economic designation, not a political governate) and the center of non-Oil related economic activity and development in the KSA - has written about some of the reasons why now might be a good time to invest there:



    Firoz has also written about the basics of FDI and how a foreign company would go about investing in the KSA:



    With well-trained, experienced professionals in both the USA & KSA, JHI's attorneys are well placed to assist American companies with transactional business law matters in the KSA, including franchising, construction and banking, as well as disputes arising from business dealings in the Kingdom (litigation in Saudi courts, hearings before local administrative boards or international arbitration).  

    Contact JHI for more information on how we can help your company to explore - and expand - the boundaries of your business.


    Firoz Mohammed, Senior Legal Consultant, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia  Mr. Firoz Mohammed is Senior Legal Counsel in our Jeddah, Saudi Arabia office.
  • Judicial Reform in Saudi Arabia

    The government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) recently announced its intention to establish training centers for judges.  Such training centers will be administered by the KSA Ministry of Justice.  This comes on the heels of King Abdullah's creation of 5,000 new judgeships in the KSA, and is accompanied by vocal opposition from the Kingdom's more traditional, conservative quarters.

    For years, the commercial community in the KSA (both local and foreign) has expressed a need for greater transparency in Saudi courts.  Procedurally and substantively, a perceived lack of predictability has resulted in a chilling effect on commerce in the KSA.

    Arbitration clauses in contracts are of uncertain enforceability in the KSA, as senior judicial officials have, in the past, deemed such clauses to be "contrary to Shari'ah".  Accordingly, irrespective of any arbitration clause in any business arrangement entered into, in the event of an irresolvable conflict between the parties one could reasonably expect such a dispute to be adjudicated before a Saudi court.


    The uncertain enforceability of arbitration clauses and perceived unpredictability of the courts have combined to generate something of a chilling effect on investment in the KSA.  Meanwhile, Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) provisions that call for entities native to any GCC Member State to be treated as a local company by the governments of each of the other Member States
    have added to the investment boom in smaller Gulf countries such as Qatar and the United Arab Emirates: some companies enter those jurisdictions in the hope that, at some point, they might be able to access the much larger Saudi market without completely exposing their investment (or, their employees) to the Saudi legal system.

    It is hoped by many in the commercial community that the addition of 5,000 new judges, uniformly trained in the enforcement of commercial and corporate law, will improve the overall business environment in the KSA by generating a greater sense of transparency and predictability in the courts.

    The details are as yet unknown; and, conservative elements who view laws and their interpretation as coming from God, not precedent, statute or human beings generally, still have opportunities to oppose the establishment and effective administration of such training centers.
      JHI will continue to track such developments as they arise.