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JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL, pc

"Exploring the Boundaries
 
of Your Business." 

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New York, New York
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JEDDAH

Khalil Khazindar Law Firm
in Association with
JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL pc
Ammar Commercial Center

Al Murjan Street (off of King Abdul Aziz Street), Office # 202
P.O. Box 157,  Jeddah  21411
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
+966 (2) 4204763 (p)
+966 (2) 4204729 (f)
www.khazindarlaw.com
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  • Saudi Banking Market to Open Up?

    During King Salman's recent visit to Washington, DC, members of the Saudi delegation issued several announcements concerning planned commercial reforms and other developments that could prove significant to Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Saudi Arabia (KSA) as the Kingdom looks to broaden its economy at a time when low oil prices are projected to be the norm for the medium term.  We will highlight some of the more significant announcements in this and subsequent notes.

    While Saudi Arabia remains committed to continuing its current record-setting output of light sweet crude (one of the major factors contributing to low oil prices), the KSA is now facing projections of massive budget deficits and rapidly depleting cash reserves.  Increased FDI, particularly from the United States, appears to be critical to the KSA's strategy for coping with the downsides of consistently low oil prices. 

    Reforms in the Arab world often begin with teasers that function as "trial balloons".  This note will reference such a trial balloon floated by a Saudi official associated with the Deputy Crown Prince.  In a closed door meeting with business leaders in DC, this official announced that the Kingdom is considering opening the Saudi banking market to permit entry of additional foreign banks - especially American ones - wishing to do business in the Kingdom.  In additional to financing major projects, it is hoped that such banks would also cater to small businesses and individual depositors.

    Even with the recent entry of a branch of a bank based in fellow Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Member State Qatar, Saudi Arabia is still seen as, perhaps, the most "under-banked" market in the world.  To attract additional FDI, which has been in slight decline in recent years, some see the entry of additional Foreign banks and the capital they bring as critical.  Entry by foreign banks based elsewhere in the GCC has been helpful, but it will take the power of additional American and other western banks to take a more broad-based growth to the next level.

    Not stated, but understood, in this announcement is Saudi Arabia's desire that western powers continue to see that they have a stake in the stability of the Kindgom vis-a-vis its continuing conflict with Iran and, increasingly, Russia.

    Of course, the devil is in the details: What will be required to gain entry? And, once in the market, how secure is a bank's investment in the Kingom and how will such a bank be regulated and taxed?  How might such a venture impact an investing bank's legal and regulatory position at home?

    JHI will continue to track the flight path of this trial balloon and let you know where it lands...
  • Exploring the Boundaries of My Own Business

    By R. Jason Huf

    When the Saudi government decided to ramp up the production of light, sweet crude oil and crash the price of it world-wide, the first thing most people in the United States (quite rightly) noticed was the sharp decline in the price of gasoline.  It’s the best break working people in America have enjoyed in a long time, and has generated economic growth that no artificial government “stimulus” program can ever hope to match.

    Middle East practitioners like myself, on the other hand, immediately understood two things:  1. the increase in production was designed to dampen the profitability of energy projects, particularly by oil & gas producers in the United States – which, in turn, helps to continue to make the maintenance of stability in Saudi Arabia a priority for Western countries and their oil-dependent economies; and, 2. it was a direct attack against the cohesiveness of the Kingdom’s arch-enemy, Iran, and some of its anti-Western allies such as Venezuela and, particularly, Russia (all three countries having economic models with price floors for oil that are unsustainable in the current environment).

    Iran's desperate economic situation notwithstanding, they have lashed out and struck back on a variety of levels and are emboldened by recent victories in Yemen, Iraq and Vienna.  Iran is increasingly aggressive in the region, and Saudi Arabia is feeling ever distant from the United States.  As to the fear of a regional arms race stemming from the unabated existence of the Iranian nuclear arms program, such an arms race is already underway.

    Keenly aware that the balance of power in the Middle East continues to swing in favor of Iran and that the United States is decreasingly interested in serving as the region's chief guarantor of security in the region, the Arab states may feel that they are in a desperate situation themselves.  Let us not forget, that the despicable and barbaric terrorist organization ISIS/ ISIL was originally cobbled together with the support of Turkey and Qatar to serve as a hyper-radicalized Sunni buffer against encroaching Shia (Iranian) power.  The Saudi move to create an oil supply glut and the joint Saudi/ Egyptian military operations against Iranian clients in Yemen seem, thus far, insufficient to halt Iranian momentum.

    If the present trend continues, a direct region-wide conflict between Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan, et al vs. Iran and Syria seems more likely, not less.

    We live in an era when asymmetrical warefare that utilizes non-uniformed combatants targeting civilians to engender fear and instability so as to achieve a political or otherwise socially relevant end (e.g., "terrorism") has become a regular feature, turning cities well behind the lines of a given conflict into battlefields themselves.  What do you do when you are a business that has invested in a region wherein the situation has become so uncertain?

    Well, that depends on the industry you are in, how much risk you (and your insurance providers) are willing to absorb, and what kind of talent you think you can attract to work in such an environment.

    As for myself, I remain committed to my relationship with Jeddah.  The Jeddah office consists of local personnel, I have spent years developing my practice, and I have never been one to simply throw away the fruits of my own hard work.  At present, my inclination is to stay the course.

    In fact, having considered this contingency for some time, I am currently leaning toward expansion, rather than withdrawal.  I feel it may soon become time to further live up to my firm's catch phrase - and, follow my natural instincts - and explore.

    JHI, Jason Huf, KSA, Saudi, Arabia, Jeddah, Medain Saleh   Whereas some firms may be examining their options on executing an exit strategy, I am exploring the possibility of expanding into new jurisdictions and expanding the range of assistance I can provide to Western companies that remain in the region.

    As an attorney, your practice is client-driven.  Some companies will stay, some will leave and new businesses will enter one or more Gulf Cooperation Council markets.  There will continue to be a need for Western legal expertise working hand-in-hand with local practitioners throughout the region.

    Perhaps more fundamentally, I am proud of the work I have done over the years.  From assisting with Shari-ah-compliant finance to education reform, I have been a small piece of a small piece in the jigsaw puzzle of helping to foster an environment wherein one may someday see a broad-based, self-sustaining middle class in the Middle East.

    This sense of accomplishment will be foremost on my mind as I look toward Exploring the Boundaries of My Own Business...


    – Jason Huf
    Friday, July 10, 2015
    New York, NY
  • Part-Time In-House Counsel: The Changing Economics of Lawyering

    As our economy transforms into something unrecognizable, the economics of the legal profession and provision of legal services have changed as well.  Since 2008, law firms and business clients have grappled with possible solutions wherein legal advice and services of sufficient quality can be provided at a cost that makes sense to all concerned, with varying success.

    You should be aware of these developments and how they may benefit your company.  One trend gaining popularity is the notion of “Part-Time In-House Counsel”, or an outside attorney from a private firm servicing your company’s in-house legal needs on a part-time basis.  This arrangement can help your company (especially if you are a small to medium-sized company) to receive the high quality legal services it needs and deserves while controlling costs.

    Establishing an in-house legal department can be an expensive prospect.  Hiring outside counsel at an hourly rate to perform traditionally in-house functions may also seem financially daunting.  However, by negotiating a fair and reasonable arrangement with an experienced attorney for the provision of traditionally in-house legal services at a fixed periodic rate, a company can acquire the safety of having the legal advice it needs at a surprisingly comfortable cost.

    Why would a law firm agree to such an arrangement?  Simply put, there is a continuing proliferation of new lawyers and the economy stinks.  Further, a law firm is a business.  Like any other business, law firms need to budget.  Before a business can budget, it needs to be able to make reasonable projections of income.  This requires steady, reliable income streams.  By agreeing to a Part-Time In-House counsel arrangement, a law firm adds a stream of steady, reliable revenue and this, in turn, helps with income predictability.

    Also, there are certain situations attorneys prefer to avoid.  Traditional arrangements, even with precautions, sometimes lead to unfortunate episodes, such as this one described by a colleague of ours in a very unvarnished fashion:  HERE

    (Yes, folks, it takes years of hard work and focus to become an attorney.  It takes many more years of dedication to become an experienced attorney.  You like to be paid for your work. So do we.)

    Making a Part-Time In-House Counsel arrangement work for all concerned is not necessarily easy – in addition to the usual conflict of interest search and other procedures law firms employ when accepting new business, the firm and the business client need to sit down and do a thorough assessment of the company’s legal needs and anticipated professional services.  The scope of the work, firm resources devoted to the Part-Time In-House Counsel work and anticipated hours per week need to be agreed upon in advance.  Also, an adult discussion about the value of the work and what the company can reasonably afford, as well as other terms of payment of costs/ compensation, needs to be held.

    Stay ahead of the curve.  Know how changes in the economics of lawyering can benefit your company.  Knowing your company's options will better enable you to Explore the Boundaries of Your Business.