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The Law Firm of

JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL, pc

"Exploring the Boundaries
 
of Your Business." 

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NEW YORK

11 Broadway, Suite 615
New York, New York
USA  10004
+1 (917) 775-0198 (p)
+1 (646) 395-1725 (f)

______________________________

JEDDAH

Khalil Khazindar Law Firm
in Association with
JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL pc
Ammar Commercial Center

Al Murjan Street (off of King Abdul Aziz Street), Office # 202
P.O. Box 157,  Jeddah  21411
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
+966 (2) 4204763 (p)
+966 (2) 4204729 (f)
www.khazindarlaw.com
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info@huflaw.com

Office Hours: By Appointment Only

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  • Big Firm Resources Without the Massive Overhead

    By R. Jason Huf

    Some of you may have obtained entry to the "Monastery" (as I've taken to calling my office) as and when business has required. However, for most of those reading this, I realize that I'm letting you in on a little secret: the advertised address of JHI's NYC HQ office is just a mail stop associated with a shared space & services operation on the 6th floor of good old 11 Broadway.  To maintain my strict "No Pop-Ins" Policy, the exact location of the Firm Headquarters Office/ Monastery's actual physical presence is kept confidential, and that confidence is only breached when necessary.

    Being able to advertise the mail stop as the office address, and the convenience of renting conference room space by the hour on the 6th floor, both enable me to concentrate on my work with minimal interruption.  In addition to this "buffer", availing myself of the shared services when certain tasks need to be performed rather efficiently assists me with keeping costs down, which in turn contributes to my ability to maintaining hourly rates that are very competitive.

    The World is Yours (As an old boss of mine used to say, "This is not the Fish Market"; but, with our competitive rates and innovative price structures, there may not be much need for you to bargain when seeking high-quality, world-class International Legal Services that your company can afford)


    Perhaps most fundamentally to those of you (still) reading this piece, JHI can make available to your company the seamless provision of professional services spanning just about the entire legal prism, without having to figure massive overhead costs into our hourly rates (or more innovative billing arrangements). The outfit that runs the 6th floor operation only caters to attorneys, and many of these attorneys elect to house their firms and solo practices in physical office space on the site. Irrespective of the level of their arrangement, all who participate in some form or another are listed in a directory and, over time, some of us get to know each other reasonably well.

    These attorneys practice in virtually every area of the law, and possess a variety of experience levels. In short, I have at my fingertips a storehouse of legal minds to draw upon, from commercial real estate specialists, to business litigators, to tax professionals - even a very smart fellow who focuses on energy trading. And, like myself, they tend to maintain a relatively unburdensome level of overhead costs, which in turn, permits them to be reasonable with their fees as well.

    A few people still tend to think of my practice as rather narrow, until I dispell them of that illusion - JHI is a Commercial, Corporate, Energy & Banking law firm and we perform a wide range of services for clients hailing from a broad variety of industries.  We just happen to have extensive experience in the Middle East, which may occassionally give rise to some folks instinctively thinking of JHI as a boutique servicing a particular "specialty" area.  However, JHI's capabilities are even broader than I previously reasoned:

    Between the NYC HQ, our Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Office, additional reources in the UAE (Abu Dhabi & Dubai) and access to Singapore and various major cities in India, JHI as a Brand is known as a capable provider of professional services in the Middle East and South Asia, ranging from company formation to arbitration, for those who have invested - or are looking to invest - in those regions in the world.

    What JHI is not (yet) necessarily known for is our ability to assist businesses based in the Middle East and elsewhere with their expansion into the US "mega-market". Whether you are an individual foreign investor entering through the EB-5 Visa process, or a family-owned conglomerate of businesses looking to invest in US real estate, or a publicly traded company in Riyadh entering a joint venture, or a participant in the new US public-private partnerships designed to reform the nation's infrastructure, JHI is well-placed to help get you started as well as protect your US-side business interests down the road.

    We have access to an entire network of intellectual assets encompassing a variety of practice areas ordinarily comanded only by big law firms, without having to factor "big firm" overhead into our fees. So, when investing from West to East, or East to West, consider the cost-effective but powerful option of contacting JHI for your legal needs.

    Feel the difference and put our NYC HQ and affiliated Community of Attorneys to work for you in concert with our Jeddah office and/ or resources in the UAE, India & Singapore (wherever you're from!) as we help you and your company Explore the Boundaries of Your Business.

     – Jason Huf
    Wednesday, August 8, 2017
    New York, NY

  • Happy Eid al-Fitr

    JHI wishes our many friends in the Muslim world a happy Eid al-Fitr.  We hope you enjoy the celebration of the spiritual, intellectual and human growth you and your families achieved during the month of Ramadan.

    We would also like to advise clients and friends who do not observe this holiday to expect office closures throughout the Middle East region, including JHI resources in Saudi Arabia & the United Arab Emirates, during the holiday.

    Peace, Holiday, JHI, Middle East, Arabia, Islam, Muslim, Eid, Law Firm, Huf, Jeddah, Abu Dhabi, Dubai, UAE, KSA, Saudia, Emirates, Corniche, Commercial, Corporate, Banking, Energy, Oil, Gas, Legal, Sharia
  • Saudi Arabia's "Companies Law" of 2015

    Saudi Arabia's (KSA) new Companies Law of 2015 came into effect on May 2, 2016.  At JHI, we wished to see the new law in practice and how it would be enforced by Saudi authorities before commenting.  In the meantime, much has already been written about the new law and we need not cover the same ground here.

    Of particular interest to clients and potential clients of JHI is, we believe, the law's provision of the option of Sole Proprietorships (or "Single-Shareholder" companies), and how applications for the licensing and registration of such by foreign investors are treated by the Ministry of Commerce and Investment and the Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority (SAGIA).

    As a general matter, the new law provides that SAGIA may continue to impose additionally stringent incorporation requirements on companies being established with the backing of foreign investors.  While the process of approving incorporation applications has been somewhat streamlined at SAGIA, a certain level of uncertainty, especially at the beginning stages of such an application, remains.

    When considering establishing or reforming an entity in the KSA, JHI feels that if a foreign investor has a trustworthy local partner/ agent (or "sponsor") then, for the time being, it may remain prudent to make use of such local parties when doing business in the Kingdom.  In addition to possibly enjoying a smoother approval process, one might avoid any potential bureaucratic pushback by some recalcitrant officials who may still be resistant to the Vision 2030 reforms more generally.

    The relationship with one's local sponsor can be further clarified via a side letter to the sponsorship agreement.  Such sideletters have been enforced by Saudi courts with increasing regularity.  And, JHI hopes that the provision for Single-Shareholder companies in the new Companies Law is not seen by the local judiciary as a rationale for reversing this trend.

    We will have more to say about the execution and enforement of the new Companies Law and other reforms as events (rapidly) progress.  Speaking of events, recent news indicates a very real likelihood of a shift in the direction of investment capital flowing between the Untied States and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Where the Riyals of the Sovereign Wealth Fund go, other Saudi-based investment capital tends to follow.  With that in mind, JHI is seriously considering offering the shepherding of EB-5 (Investor) Visa applications to the menu of professional services our firm offers to incoming companies that invest in the United States, particularly New York, Pennsylvania and/ or New Jersey, where Mr. Huf is admitted to bar.  JHI will have more to say on this in the near future as well.
  • N. Mandela and How the "Soprano State" Doesn't Work in Africa, Either

    On the evening of September 22, 2016, Mr. Huf attended an event featuring Ndaba Mandela, Chairman & Co-Founder of the "Africa Rising" Foundation, and grandson of late South African President Nelson Mandela.  Mr. Mandela was in New York during the Convening of the United Nations (UN) General Assembly and spoke at the New York City Bar Association on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) vis-a-vis African states, particularly Goal # 16 (concerning Good Governance, Anti-Corruption and Rule of Law).


    Ndaba Mandela, Africa Rising Foundation & R. Jason Huf, Huf International (JHI, pc)
    (Left to Right: Mr. Ndaba Mandela, Chairman & Co-Founder of the "Africa Rising" Foundation; and, Jason Huf)

    Mr. Huf grew up in New Jersey, and has lived there for roughly half the sum total of his life thus far.  He knows, first-hand, the economically and socially corrosive effects of political corruption, and the crippling effect a government that serves only to facilitate corruption can have on a state and the people who live in such a place.

    That said, Mr. Huf limited himself to listening.  After all, while lawyers may be at the bottom rung of the ladder among the governing class, lawyers are still part of the governing class.  Mr. Huf thought it best to listen to - and learn from - someone who speaks for some of the people of the developing world who have been poorly served (and, often, downright exploited and oppressed) by those who govern their countries:  "Far be it from me to tell him what he should want.  He knows what he wants!", Mr. Huf later said of his interraction with Mr. Mandela.

    More judges, better educational opportunities, and the like were offered up as being helpful tools in pursuit of SDG # 16.  But, Mr. Mandela most strongly asserted that it was up to the people themselves, not judges appointed by corrupt dictators and oligarchs, to assert themselves and demand access to the clean water, medical treatment and other resources which are rightfully theirs.

    He has a point - who would simply sit there watching their child die of a perfectly preventable disease and patiently wait for a UN team to swing by and, after some years, convince the multi-millionare colonel/ President of their otherwise poor country to suddenly have a change of heart and appoint honest judges and fly in doctors, food, agriculture & water treatment specialists instead of buying that third villa in Switzerland?

    And, he makes that point with evident sincerity and passion, as one might expect given the heavy legacy he inherits from his iconic grandfather.  The SDGs are ambitious and, if only because of that ambition, useful.  But, absent people demanding responsibility for, and power over, their own futures, the progress that can be made toward the SDGs is likely somewhat limited.

    Specifically, it does not seem possible to accomplish any of the SDGs without first making serious advances on SDG # 16, given the destructive and stifling effect bad governance and political corruption consistently have on  factors necessary to achieve the other Sustainable Development Goals.  Rule of Law is, quite simply, a must for any civilization to achieve real success, whether it be Sierra Leone, Nigeria, the Republic of South Africa, or New Jersey.  And SDG # 16 is unlikely to be accomplished without the engagement of an affected population.

    Mr. Huf expressed genuine pleasure over meeting Mr. Mandela and looks forward to similar opportunities as he tracks the progress of the SDGs at the UN as Representative (Observer) of a Non-Governmental Organization (NGO), particularly as and when such may impact the "corporate responsibilities" of companies doing business internationally.

    The evening with Mr. Mandela was organized by the New York City Bar Association's UN Committee, which invited the New York County Lawyers' Association's (NYCLA) Foreign & International Law Committee to co-sponsor the event.  As Co-Chairman of NYCLA's Foreign & International Law Committee, Mr. Huf hopes the success of this event provides the basis for establishing a model of cooperation between committees of different bar associations on synergetic issues of importance to the legal community and society more broadly.
  • New Jersey Senate Passes International Arbitration Bill

    The New Jersey (NJ) Senate, by unanimous vote, has passed Senate Bill 602, the "New Jersey International Arbitration, Mediation and Conciliation Act", sponsored by Senate Minority Leader Thomas H. Kean, Jr.

    A step in the right direction, if this bill becomes law as presently written, it would empower public research universities in the state to establish centers for arbitration and mediation, with such centers providing their own procedural rules.

    Parties having a qualifying dispute would chose their own substantive law (with NJ law serving as the “gap filler”) and would be able opt into such a center’s procedural rules or any other set of procedural rules the parties agree to choose.

    A qualifying dispute would be one in which one or more of the parties is a non-US resident (individual or corporate) as defined by the bill, or when the property or other asset(s) in controversy are located outside of the United States, or when the underlying business relationship significantly concerns some foreign jurisdiction.  Domestic commercial disputes may also be arbitrated or mediated at such a center, provided the parties expressly agree to avail themselves of such a facility in the dispute resolution clause of the underlying contract.

    Parties who elect to have their dispute heard before a panel or tribunal housed by an arbitration center in NJ would have to fully fund a bond equal to the amount of their exposure in the controversy.  Additionally, the parties would be deemed to have voluntarily submitted themselves to the (in personam) jurisdiction of the courts of New Jersey upon the execution of their agreement to arbitrate in the state, but only to the extent required by the arbitration and enforcement its resulting decision.

    Having been passed by the NJ Senate, the bill now moves to the relevant committee of the NJ General Assembly.

    JHI will continue to track this legislation.
  • Happy Eid al-Fitr

    JHI wishes our many friends in the Muslim world a happy Eid al-Fitr.  We hope you enjoy the celebration of the spiritual, intellectual and human growth you and your families achieved during the month of Ramadan.

    Eid al-Fitr, Jeddah, NYC, New York, KSA, Saudi, Gulf, Arabia, Islam, Muslim, Holiday, Ramadan, JHI, Law irm, Law, Legal, New York, Business  We would also like to advise clients and friends who do not observe this holiday to expect office closures throughout the Middle East region during the holiday.

  • Happy Eid al-Fitr

    JHI wishes our many friends in the Muslim world a happy Eid al-Fitr.  We would also like to advise clients and friends who do not observe this holiday to expect delays in certain services, and possible disruptions of projected time frames, due to office closures throughout the Middle East region during the holiday.
  • Its Fracking Summertime

    Between the July 4 weekend and other summer holidays, high summer in the Middle East, the holy month of Ramadan, and some sort of soccer tournament, we find ourselves in the unusual position of having a little free time here at JHI.

    As such, watch THIS SPACE:  In the coming weeks, JHI will post a brief article right here in our Notes & Comments section on Hydraulic Fracturing (colloquially referred to as “Fracking”).

    Following Labor Day, JHI will publish a brief note on contracting with parties in Middle Eastern jurisdictions (in particular, Saudi Arabia (KSA) and the United Arab Emirates(UAE)); and, in a subsequent writing, JHI will share some thoughts on Arbitration Clauses when doing business internationally.

    And, while there tends not to be many developments in the law anywhere in world during these summer months, JHI will continue to keep our eyes peeling concerning such developments as and when they affect Marcellus Shale Natural Gas, Charter Schools, Municipalities, Middle Eastern jurisdictions (particularly Gulf Cooperation Council jurisdictions), the law of Contracts, the laws of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the UAE (Abu Dhabi and Dubai) and the KSA, and business law generally.

    In the meantime, we would just like to wish all concerned a safe and happy summertime!
  • Part-Time In-House Counsel: The Changing Economics of Lawyering

    As our economy transforms into something unrecognizable, the economics of the legal profession and provision of legal services have changed as well.  Since 2008, law firms and business clients have grappled with possible solutions wherein legal advice and services of sufficient quality can be provided at a cost that makes sense to all concerned, with varying success.

    You should be aware of these developments and how they may benefit your company.  One trend gaining popularity is the notion of “Part-Time In-House Counsel”, or an outside attorney from a private firm servicing your company’s in-house legal needs on a part-time basis.  This arrangement can help your company (especially if you are a small to medium-sized company) to receive the high quality legal services it needs and deserves while controlling costs.

    Establishing an in-house legal department can be an expensive prospect.  Hiring outside counsel at an hourly rate to perform traditionally in-house functions may also seem financially daunting.  However, by negotiating a fair and reasonable arrangement with an experienced attorney for the provision of traditionally in-house legal services at a fixed periodic rate, a company can acquire the safety of having the legal advice it needs at a surprisingly comfortable cost.

    Why would a law firm agree to such an arrangement?  Simply put, there is a continuing proliferation of new lawyers and the economy stinks.  Further, a law firm is a business.  Like any other business, law firms need to budget.  Before a business can budget, it needs to be able to make reasonable projections of income.  This requires steady, reliable income streams.  By agreeing to a Part-Time In-House counsel arrangement, a law firm adds a stream of steady, reliable revenue and this, in turn, helps with income predictability.

    Also, there are certain situations attorneys prefer to avoid.  Traditional arrangements, even with precautions, sometimes lead to unfortunate episodes, such as this one described by a colleague of ours in a very unvarnished fashion:  HERE

    (Yes, folks, it takes years of hard work and focus to become an attorney.  It takes many more years of dedication to become an experienced attorney.  You like to be paid for your work. So do we.)

    Making a Part-Time In-House Counsel arrangement work for all concerned is not necessarily easy – in addition to the usual conflict of interest search and other procedures law firms employ when accepting new business, the firm and the business client need to sit down and do a thorough assessment of the company’s legal needs and anticipated professional services.  The scope of the work, firm resources devoted to the Part-Time In-House Counsel work and anticipated hours per week need to be agreed upon in advance.  Also, an adult discussion about the value of the work and what the company can reasonably afford, as well as other terms of payment of costs/ compensation, needs to be held.

    Stay ahead of the curve.  Know how changes in the economics of lawyering can benefit your company.  Knowing your company's options will better enable you to Explore the Boundaries of Your Business.

  • NJ Legislature May Address Local Governments' Expenditures for Legal Services

    The State Comptroller recently determined that some local government bodies in New Jersey have been paying grossly excessive bills for legal services.  In response to the Comptroller’s findings, it seems the New Jersey Senate soon plans (perhaps after November’s state elections) to take up legislation that supporters say is designed to address the problem.

    At the time of this writing, the proposed legislation appears designed to further regulate the process of selecting Town Attorneys and attorneys representing other local government entities, as well as regulating the substantive content of public legal services contracts.  Supporters claim the pending Senate bill would to require a definition of the Scope of Work, mandate clear determination of billing (such as which services are covered by the initial “retainer” and which services are subject to an additional hourly rate) and prohibit law firms from billing an hourly rate for work performed by support staff. Presently, no branch of government in the Garden State yet shows any interest in addressing the political corruption that gives rise to the potential for abusive billing practices by politically connected law firms.

    While we hope the contemplated legislation succeeds in achieving its purported aims, JHI does not intend to change its current practices: JHI already offers clear and concise terms of service, including our innovative “annual flat fee” billing structure.  This allows Township Committees and other local government bodies to reliably budget for legal services and systemically guarantees the prevention of abusive billing practices.  Our option of an Annual Flat Fee structure does not include dealing with C.O.A.H. (yep, C.O.A.H. ain’t dead yet – sorry folks).  However, the state legislature could always turn its attention to eliminating that particular source of expensive litigation.  After the next election, of course…