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JEDDAH

Khalil Khazindar Law Firm
in Association with
JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL pc
Ammar Commercial Center

Al Murjan Street (off of King Abdul Aziz Street), Office # 202
P.O. Box 157,  Jeddah  21411
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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  • Continuing Legal Education (CLE) in 2016

    In April of 2016, Mr. Huf was honored to serve as Moderator of two different panel programs offered by the New York County Lawyers' Association (NYCLA).  The first program was a Continuing Legal Education (CLE) course concerning the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA/ the Act), the second offered Ethics Credit and concerned Attorney "Branding" & conforming with the Rules of Professional Responsibility.

    The CLE panel on the FCPA discussed the increasingly broad and robust enforcement of the Act, and the implications for Corporations that do business internationally, as well as its responsible officers and the potential for individual liability/ culpability.  The panelists not only discussed what to do in the event of an FCPA problem, but their thoughts on how to avoid such problems in the first place - now and in the future as the law evolves.

    Jason Huf, Jay Safer, Glenn Jones, James McGovern, Clara Flebus
    (Left to Right: Jason Huf; Jay G. Safer, Wollmuth, Maher & Deutsch; Glenn Jones, Law Offices of Glenn M. Jones; James McGovern, Hogan Lovells; Clara Flebus, Co-Chair, NYCLA Foreign & International Law Committee)

    The Branding panel provided an overview of marketing methods and the why and how of establishing a "Brand" - the "dos and the don'ts".  (Mr. Huf notes that he still has to establish a Youtube page for his firm, JHI!)  The panel also discussed how to plan and execute a marketing program that does not run afoul of the Rules of Professional Responsibility and agreed that, in addition to being every attorney's responsibility, being Ethical should, in fact, be a fundamental part of an attorney's Brand.

    The Rules of Professional Responsibility tend to follow changes in technology, and developing technologies are an important driver in the evolution of legal marketing programs.  Accordingly, the panel also discussed trends and the direction the Rules of Ethics might possibly take, including recent recommendations by NYCLA, as rule-makers chase after these rapidly-developing technologies and the ethical implications of their use.

    Clara Flebus, Penn Dodson, Rick Brownell, James Walker, Steve Perih, Jason Huf
    (Left to Right: Clara Flebus; Penn Dodson, AndersonDodson; Richard Brownell; James Q. Walker, Richards, Kibbe & Orbe, and Chairman of NYCLA's Committee on Professional Ethics; Stephen Perih, TransPerfect; Jason Huf)

    As Co-Chairman of NYCLA's Foreign & International Law Committee, Mr. Huf proudly notes that NYCLA constantly offers interesting, relevant and forward-looking CLE programs and other valuable forums for continued learning on a regular basis; and, states that consumers of such programs can look forward to the steady provision of additional thoughtful and cost-effective programs now and in the future.  For more information on NYCLA's CLE offerings, please visit www.nycla.org

    Mr. Huf will, of course, continue to advise friends and colleagues of CLE programs and other speaking engagements wherein he is a participant in 2017 as the new year approaches.
  • Meh, So What's an Entire Summer Wasted... No Biggie

    By R. Jason Huf

    You know why you went to law school in the first place:  You wanted to help people, change the world, "make a difference", be part of the solution... to whatever.  Yeah, and you wanted to live a glorious, fabulous lifestyle at the top of the heap, respected by society and basking in financial comfort.  What, no?  Liar.

    When you finally graduated and passed the bar exam, your new professional qualification represented to you - at long last - the Keys to the Kingdom!

    Lawyer Attorney Lifestyle


    OK, so how's that workin' out for ya?

    Now that I'm exactly one week into my latest attempt to quit smoking, and as the cold wind howls off the waters of the South Seaport and into the concrete canyons of Downtown Manhattan's Financial District, signaling the evaporation of yet another summer, I reasoned that penning my previously-promised piece on Work/ Life Balance would be timely.

    Liberty Cold Wet Windy Winter Sucks   (The cold wind cometh... )

    You've devoted the first "better" half of your life to developing, well, a better life for you and yours.

    Late nights at the office during the beginning of your career - part of the drill.  No biggie.

    More late nights managing junior fee earners once you become more seasoned - part of the drill, and "almost there".  No biggie.

    You're now a partner or solo practitioner and the near-constant focus is on client development; or a GC who is a company's responsible officer with a hand in everything from strategic decisions to managing the costs of outside counsel while demonstrating value for those costs; "sigh" - part of the drill, once the rain comes in steady, or I make it to the board of directors, its smooth sailing.  No biggie.

    Then...  You've made it!  Finally!!  You're also 60 years old.  Its over...  Where did the time go and what was it for?  It doesn't matter.  Bye-bye.  Oh yeah, and:  No Biggie.

    My Office Doesn't Look Like This, Either   (No, my office doesn't look like this, either... )

    Time is the one resource we can never obtain more of - only less.  Every day.  Whether we actually make good (or, any) use of it or not.

    And, particularly with lawyers, once we become good at something in our field - whatever your practice areas - those things tend to become routine.  Eventually, routine becomes routine.  We go through the motions, the excitement of "changing the world" goes away, and its the same old same old that one cannot get away from for even the smallest amount of time, because we've got to do that billable work so we can pay those bills.  Joy.


    Bread and Butter Work   ("Seriously, I went to law school for this?")

    I worked for years to build my reputation as "Mr. Middle East".  However, there are no more revolutionary Shari'ah-compliant financing products to help invent, no more reforms to educational systems in different parts of Arabia.  Doing client work that, in some small way, may someday help to generate a broad-based, self-sustaining middle class in the Middle East is more or less over with.  Moving forward, whatever happens there is pretty much already in the cards.  All too often, I arrive home at 1:00am or so, pet my dog, and think of something along the lines of "Another fast food franchise on Hamdan Street... " or "Another oil refinery in the middle of some dusty nowhere... "  followed by the usual  "Yay.  Who cares."


    Jason Huf Saudi ARabiaJason Huf Abu Dhabi Stock ExchangeJason Huf PortraitJason Huf & Women's Rights in Saudi ArabiaJason Huf & Women's Rights in Saudi ArabiaJason Huf & Saudi Vision 2030

    That's not good.  A steady supply of "Bread and Butter" is nice to have, but when its all you have, things can get pretty damned dull.  When we get to the point when our work day is up to 16 or even 20 hours a day some days, 5 or 6 days per week, and we no longer care about what we're doing, much less have a passion for it, then this invariably leads to the most dreaded word in the legal lexicon.  The "B Word"...

    Dan Fielding Burnout Lawyers Attorneys Lifestyle ork Life Balance   BURNOUT!!!

    Like many in our profession, I've always been something of a minor league insomniac, so why not work late into the night, anyway?  I've done some of my best thinking at 10:00pm.  Of course, this means I won't be able to decompress to the point where I can sleep until 3:00am, and that's not good when you have to wake up at 6:00am.

    Professional and personal dissatisfaction, as well as chronic exhaustion and "no life syndrome", are common among lawyers.  And, there's no way out:  you've already invested too much into your career, and your life (or, mere existence, such as it may be) is already half over anyway.

    Not necessarily!  The good news is, if you're good at your job, your success partially stems from your possession of excellent time management skills and your adept ability to prioritize tasks.  Put those skills to work and carve out some free time - make "having a life" one of those tasks which you prioritize on a regular (well OK - semi-regular) basis.


    Rest Recreation Time Management  (R&R - fit in in!)

    We are in the business of being effective counselors who help our clients, be they individual or corporate clients.  If you're not being good to yourself, its only a matter of time before you're not being as good as you could and should be for your clients.

    I began this summer thinking it was time for "Mr. Middle East" to make full use of his time and status (OK, "Mr. Middle East" may not be lofty to the point of august, but it is kind of snazzy... ).  And, then, I proceeded to more or less waste my entire summer.  So, what's one summer?  No biggie....  Wrong.  Its a "biggie".  Given my visceral dislike of winter, its effectively the waste of an entire year. Enjoying anything in the cold, wet, sharp, biting wind of the winter months takes considerable effort - and, anything that requires so much effort to "enjoy" is, definitionally, unenjoyable.

    At my age, a year's worth of waste is waste I can ill-afford.  I will never permit that to happen again - and, neither should you.

    Necessary late nights will happen.  That cannot be helped.  But, working late for the mere sake of making "valuable" use of your waking hours misses the real value of time.

    You - and your clients - can withstand you taking an evening, or even an entire day, off.  Working from home once in a while isn't the end of the world, either.  Trimming that commute time off of your schedule can make a heck of a difference, and technology makes working from home easier than ever.

    In managing your time and prioritizing your tasks to make room for an actual "life", don't just take advantage of good weather as and when the seasons of the year allow, but make the most of the location where you are based:  whether you've planted your flag in New York, Philadelphia, London, Jeddah, Abu Dhabi, Tampa, Florida or Ashville, North Carolina, you live in one of the great cities of the world - make the most of it.  Its practically a sin if you don't!

    In New York, where I chose to locate JHI's HQ, I am a subway ride from some of the most exciting entertainment on earth, and walking distance from several quick, pleasant distractions.

    Lawyer Attorney Lifestyle Work Life Balance   (The World-Famous ROCKETTES!!)

    Whether its taking a few hours one evening to enjoy the spectacle of the world's greatest precision dance troupe at work, or a stroll through battery park after your afternoon nap, a brief refresher could actually increase the quality or your work while not severly limiting the amount of time available for work.

    In addition to a bit of exercise, a proper diet doesn't hurt, either...

    Taking an obscenely long lunch at a comfortable, but not too over-priced, local eatery may be just the ticket when looking for R&R opportunities that will make your thoughts sharper, more clear and faster but more thorough.  You won't be able to send your client the bill, but perhaps you should given the subsequent improvement in your performance that results from taking a nice, relaxing breather...


    Lawyer Attorney Lifestyle Work Life Balance ("I wonder if they still serve those off-menu parmesean fries... ")

    You can also combine business with pleasure.  For example, in line with my loathing for winter, during the bitter months of January and/ or February, I am considering taking a tour of the Middle East and South Asia where the weather will be perfect at that time of year, to visit the Jeddah, KSA office as well as possible expansion points for JHI in the jurisdictions/ markets of the United Arab Emirates (Abu Dhabi & Dubai), Singapore and India. 

    Well, I gotta go - I've always wanted to date a Rockette and that's not going to happen by itself, nor will I be able to make it happen while sitting within the four walls of my office.

    For now, remember: being good to others first requires that you be good to yourself.  Although its easier said than done, "Don't Live to Work, Work to Live" - get back to living the life you intended to live when you started this journey.  It comes down to good time management and shrewd prioritization.  If you have run out of professional challenges, perhaps find one or two new challenges in your travels.  And, there is one more thing that anyone can do, everyone should do more often, it doesn't cost you anything or require additional time, and if you do it more often, it can make a world of difference:

    Lawyer Attorney Lifestyle Work Life Balance SMILE!        SMILE !!


    - Jason Huf
    Tuesday, October 11, 2016
    New York, NY
  • WARNING: Quitting Smoking Can Be Hazardous To the Health of Your Career

    By R. Jason Huf
     
    You’re in control.  You’re paid to be in control.  Its not just professional reputation and “image”, its part of who you are (otherwise, that “image” would never fly and your professional reputation would be quite different).
     
    Now, you’re no longer at an age when you’re indestructible.  You’re in, say, your early 30s, you’ve started a family, and you have other concerns ranging from personal health to time management that supersede the importance of getting in that occasional puff, right?
     
    Time to quit smoking.
     
    Congratulations!  You are now on the road to better health.  Air will smell sweeter, food will taste better.  You’ll not have to blow 20+ minutes every two hours riding elevators just to go out into the cold wind and suck one down.  You’ll be here on earth longer for your loved ones.  And, you’ve just said “Good-Bye” to being in control…
     
    "I guess I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue... "

    Those of you who are not smokers are going to write this off as fiction.  After all, enjoying tobacco is no where near the same league as being a heroin addict, a coke head, or some kind of angry alcoholic who drinks whiskey for breakfast.  On several levels, that’s true.  In any event, the following doesn’t so much apply to you, so feel free to skip it.  Now, for my fellow smokers…
     
    As someone who recently suspended his second serious attempt at quitting smoking, I’m confident that I speak with at least some minor amount of authority on this.  My first attempt, years ago, ended with friends handing me cigarettes, calling me a pain in the derriere and more or less telling me to have a smoke and shut up.  I like being “Mr. Nice Guy”.  Knowing I was being something of a monster, I took their advice.
     
    Years later, I am in my 40s, I have my own firm, I am unmarried, clients tend to trust me – I just about answer to no one.  I am in as much command of all I survey, and my remaining future, as I am ever likely to be.  This time it won’t be quite so bad, right?   WRONG.
     
    It was even worse.  Let’s face it, you are dealing with a highly addictive substance (both bio-chemically and psychologically), the use of which is deeply ingrained into your routine.  While individual smokers are each going to react to nicotine withdrawal somewhat differently, talking with other smokers it seems not uncommon that (as happened in my case) every bit of good judgment you’ve ever had will go out the window, and you will say and do things that exemplify the exact opposite of your instincts.  Its like being George Costanza – on crack.
     
    Twiiiiiix!!
     
    “Water off a duck’s back” is part of my very nature.  I lived and worked in, according to many people, the first or second most stressful place on planet earth (no, not New Jersey – the Middle East) for years, and I had a great time.
     
    I find what I call “unnecessary drama” to be entirely repellant.  I never understood it, it serves no useful purpose and it’s a complete turn-off.  For me, it is instantly revolting.  And yet, just a few days after quitting smoking, I was the King of Unnecessary Dramas.  Putting something into a microwave oven, setting it for two minutes, and then becoming visibly and verbally agitated because two minutes is actually taking two minutes makes no sense.  Having the irrepressible, manic need to make sure someone – anyone – knows about your overwhelming sense of frustration, however, is worse than irrational.  It is thoroughly obnoxious.
     
    If you’ve already lived this nightmare and don’t wish to relive it, avert your eyes, (if you haven’t already).  If not, then picture if you will...
     
    Imagine if you will...     a bizarre realm...
     
    You will lash out over the silliest things.  Every matter great or small, real or perceived, will take on an urgency that one normally associates with a burning building.  You will know that this lashing-out is a mistake, do it anyway and then feel embarrassed to the point of being disturbed by your own behavior almost immediately afterward.  And then, just five minutes later, you’ll be doing it all over again.  Everyone in your orbit will suffer, including you.

    Lock me up, baby!
     
    What this kind of bizarre behavior can do to your image, professional reputation and your career is obvious.  And, to make matters worse, as lawyers, these brains of ours are what we work with – it’s the most important tool in the shed.  So, naturally, trying to bury yourself in your work as the storm passes seems a rather dangerous solution.

    And, what about the ethical implications of insisting on continuing your work??
     
    That said, you still have to get stuff done.  You can’t isolate yourself.  Moving into a cabin without access to electricity in northern Canada for two weeks and wrestling polar bears (or, whatever folks up there do for exercise) isn’t an option.  And, for those of you who remember the old TV show “Get Smart”, I’m sorry to break this to you, but the “Cone of Silence” doesn’t actually work…

    Can't Isolate Yourself

    You can’t just quit quitting – that would be quitting!  Another loss of control.  The cherry on top of a monumental, multi-layered failure.  If we were OK with failure, we wouldn’t be lawyers.
     
    You had such high hopes and great confidence when you first decided to quit smoking.  Now, you are in this terrible Catch-22.  If you continue to ride this out, how much (more) damage are you likely to cause?  But, you cannot allow the misery of the previous eternal week or two to have been in vain, and you simply cannot cave in and fail.
     
    Yes you can.  Hanging your head in shame, you rush off to the store one evening, buy a pack of cigarettes, and before the night is out you have incinerated and inhaled half the contents of that pack.  The next morning, you are back to smoking just as much as you used to smoke, and you are a Human Being again…  A deeply ashamed one, and certainly a total failure.  But, at least you’re a member of the species once more.

    And, you can always say that you had to smoke again in order to be compliant with the Rules of Professional Responsibility.  No one will have anything to say once you hang your hat on that!
     
    Yes, I failed at this.  Again…
     
    Well, its not failure if its a learning experience.  I am not writing this to dissuade you, my friends and colleagues, from quitting smoking.  I am providing a heads-up.  We don’t discuss this very often specifically because it is embarrassing, and it makes us sound weak.
     
    Based on what I’ve learned thus far, here are some (I hope) helpful tips on how to beat smoking without beating your career into a pulp and seeing many years of hard work and cool, reliable performance go down the drain:
     
    1.  See a doctor before quitting.  This little blog article is not comprehensive medical advice and I do not know the state of your health – withdrawal symptoms may vary from person-to-person, and you should seek qualified medical advice before making any serious health decisions.  This isn’t just the ordinary disclaimer from one attorney writing to other attorneys (although, that’s in there, too).  Visiting a doctor after you’ve started the process of quitting tobacco in the hopes of obtaining something that will help to mitigate the withdrawal symptoms is OK, but its better to see one before you start.  Know as much about the current state of your health as you can prior to throwing yourself into the thresher.
     
    I will write more broadly about Work/ Life Balance in a subsequent piece.  But, for now, if you are under the kind of exhaustion and tension commonly plaguing attorneys – if you are suffering from, say, extreme sleep deprivation, nervous exhaustion, dehydration, a wildly irregular heartbeat or are just plain constantly tired, then address that first.  If you are taking in as much as three pots of strong coffee per day to make up for a consistent lack of sleep, then this may not be the best time for you to try quitting smoking.
     
    The bottom line is this:  while it may sound counterintuitive, be in your best possible shape before you begin the process of quitting smoking.
     
    2.  On the subject of finding something that actually helps with mitigating withdrawal symptoms, well, “Cold Turkey” ain’t for everybody.  It wasn’t for me.  That said, be mindful of the side effects of such aids (from appetite suppression to much worse).  The most harmless thing seemed the gum, but I found it to be disgusting.  More than one person suggested “Vaping”.  While I have seen may use it as a substitute, and with some success, I have yet to meet anyone who has since managed to give up the Vaping.  I wouldn’t look to swap one harmful vice for another, myself – even if the substitute is somewhat less harmful.
     
    Again, see a doctor and sort out exactly which aid(s) works best for you.
     
    3.  If you do decide to go Cold Turkey, but reduce your daily intake of cigarettes before the appointed time of quitting in the hopes that the symptoms of quitting nicotine will not be so severe, then you may wish to give yourself more than a few days to deescalate.  Trust me on this one.
     
    4.  Finally, and as discussed, you cannot isolate yourself from civilization.  But, you can do two things:  a. let others know you are quitting; and, b. establish “buffers”.
     
    Telling people you are quitting smoking is not setting yourself up for additional embarrassment in the event you fail (and, never be one of those who “Plan to Fail”).  In fact, it may help them to understand your embarrassing behavior while you undergo withdrawal.  At the very least, it will let them know to keep their distance, even if you personally lose sight of the importance of distance during this period.
     
    Buffers can help to maintain that distance, even as you manically attempt to lash out and inflict your new, alien frustrations on the entire human race.  Work from home, if you can (and, technology makes it easier than ever).  Limit your face-to-face appointments to the extent you can.  Get someone else at the firm to do you a solid and appear at the court to file those motions for you during a particularly rough morning.  Lock your phone in a desk drawer, check it at specific times.  For emails and voice messages, put a minimum buffer time on your response, if one is required (and, during that time, consider what is actually required – do not say anything that is not required).  While some of your work is bound to be time-sensitive and good response times are a must in our business, nothing is so super urgent that it can’t wait for a few minutes.  A measured response is always better than a weird one and, let’s face it, your client isn’t on Death Row waiting for that last-minute call from the Governor that’s never going to come anyway.
     
    I hope that helps.
     
    In any event, now that I am smoking again and back to being my rock-solid, famously "Steady" self, I would like to apologize to all those I may have offended these past couple of weeks; and, apologize in advance to all those I may offend in the near future.  Because, after I address a few health concerns stemming from that lack of Work/ Life Balance I referenced earlier, I am returning to quitting smoking.
     
    As I said, this latest attempt is merely suspended.
     
    For now, I’m going to go home, put up my feet, and light one up.  I hope you enjoy your weekend as well.
     
     – Jason Huf
    Thursday, August 25, 2016
    New York, NY
  • Part-Time In-House Counsel: The Changing Economics of Lawyering

    As our economy transforms into something unrecognizable, the economics of the legal profession and provision of legal services have changed as well.  Since 2008, law firms and business clients have grappled with possible solutions wherein legal advice and services of sufficient quality can be provided at a cost that makes sense to all concerned, with varying success.

    You should be aware of these developments and how they may benefit your company.  One trend gaining popularity is the notion of “Part-Time In-House Counsel”, or an outside attorney from a private firm servicing your company’s in-house legal needs on a part-time basis.  This arrangement can help your company (especially if you are a small to medium-sized company) to receive the high quality legal services it needs and deserves while controlling costs.

    Establishing an in-house legal department can be an expensive prospect.  Hiring outside counsel at an hourly rate to perform traditionally in-house functions may also seem financially daunting.  However, by negotiating a fair and reasonable arrangement with an experienced attorney for the provision of traditionally in-house legal services at a fixed periodic rate, a company can acquire the safety of having the legal advice it needs at a surprisingly comfortable cost.

    Why would a law firm agree to such an arrangement?  Simply put, there is a continuing proliferation of new lawyers and the economy stinks.  Further, a law firm is a business.  Like any other business, law firms need to budget.  Before a business can budget, it needs to be able to make reasonable projections of income.  This requires steady, reliable income streams.  By agreeing to a Part-Time In-House counsel arrangement, a law firm adds a stream of steady, reliable revenue and this, in turn, helps with income predictability.

    Also, there are certain situations attorneys prefer to avoid.  Traditional arrangements, even with precautions, sometimes lead to unfortunate episodes, such as this one described by a colleague of ours in a very unvarnished fashion:  HERE

    (Yes, folks, it takes years of hard work and focus to become an attorney.  It takes many more years of dedication to become an experienced attorney.  You like to be paid for your work. So do we.)

    Making a Part-Time In-House Counsel arrangement work for all concerned is not necessarily easy – in addition to the usual conflict of interest search and other procedures law firms employ when accepting new business, the firm and the business client need to sit down and do a thorough assessment of the company’s legal needs and anticipated professional services.  The scope of the work, firm resources devoted to the Part-Time In-House Counsel work and anticipated hours per week need to be agreed upon in advance.  Also, an adult discussion about the value of the work and what the company can reasonably afford, as well as other terms of payment of costs/ compensation, needs to be held.

    Stay ahead of the curve.  Know how changes in the economics of lawyering can benefit your company.  Knowing your company's options will better enable you to Explore the Boundaries of Your Business.