Contact us!
The Law Firm of

JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL, pc

"Exploring the Boundaries
 
of Your Business." 

______________________________

In NEW YORK
PENNSYLVANIA
& NEW JERSEY

Call:

+1 (646) 470-2729

______________________________

In JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA
& Other GCC Jurisdictions:


Khalil Khazindar Law Firm
in Association with
JASON HUF INTERNATIONAL pc
Ammar Commercial Center

Al Murjan Street (off of King Abdul Aziz Street), Office # 202
P.O. Box 157,  Jeddah  21411
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
+966 (2) 4204763 (p)
+966 (2) 4204729 (f)
www.khazindarlaw.com
______________________________

E-Mail: 

info@huflaw.com

Office Hours:  By Appointment Only

Follow JHI
  • <iframe src="//www.facebook.com/plugins/follow?href=https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?i

  • @JasonHufIntl

 
Links


GEO Flight Academy:

www.geoflightacademy.org


Big Brothers Big Sisters of Burlington, Camden & Gloucester Counties (NJ):

www.bbbsbcg.org


Salvation Army:

www.salvationarmy.org


Manar al-Athar:

www.manar-al-athar.ox.ac.uk


Figure Skating in Harlem:

https://figureskatinginharlem.org


Purses with a Purpose:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1412771915622750/about/


American Red Cross (Donate Blood):

https://www.redcross.org/give-blood

Doha
Abu Dhabi
Bahrain
Dubai
  • Its Fracking Summertime

    Between the July 4 weekend and other summer holidays, high summer in the Middle East, the holy month of Ramadan, and some sort of soccer tournament, we find ourselves in the unusual position of having a little free time here at JHI.

    As such, watch THIS SPACE:  In the coming weeks, JHI will post a brief article right here in our Notes & Comments section on Hydraulic Fracturing (colloquially referred to as “Fracking”).

    Following Labor Day, JHI will publish a brief note on contracting with parties in Middle Eastern jurisdictions (in particular, Saudi Arabia (KSA) and the United Arab Emirates(UAE)); and, in a subsequent writing, JHI will share some thoughts on Arbitration Clauses when doing business internationally.

    And, while there tends not to be many developments in the law anywhere in world during these summer months, JHI will continue to keep our eyes peeling concerning such developments as and when they affect Marcellus Shale Natural Gas, Charter Schools, Municipalities, Middle Eastern jurisdictions (particularly Gulf Cooperation Council jurisdictions), the law of Contracts, the laws of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the UAE (Abu Dhabi and Dubai) and the KSA, and business law generally.

    In the meantime, we would just like to wish all concerned a safe and happy summertime!
  • Tracking Marcellus Shale Legislation

    On March 17, 2014, HB 1684 passed out of the Pennsylvania House of Representative's Environmental Resources and Energy Committee and now awaits the consideration of the whole House.  The bill seeks to define the term "post production costs" and mandates that deductions by gas producers/ lessees of natural gas rights cannot deduct for post production costs to the extent that the net royalty paid on extracted gas is reduced to below 12.5%.

    In its current form, the bill would provide that royalties for unconventional wells would be calculated when the gas enters the commercial marketplace, as ownership of the gas passes on to an unrelated entity (an entity "at arms length").  In the event such receiving/ purchasing entity does not meet the definition of "unrelated", the lessee/ producer has the burden of proof in showing that the royalty generated is at fair market value.

    HB 1684 also provides for a 12.5 percent "Minimum".  That is to say, post production costs cannot drive the royalty actually paid out after calculation to an amount below the 12.5 percent mark.  And, such post production costs will have to be itemized for the benefit of the owner in accordance with the guidelines set forth in the legislation.

    While the bill would affect current as well as future lease agreements, it does not retroactively impact royalties already paid out.  That said, this is especially important in light of a recent push to enforce "forced grouping" or "forced pooling" beyond the Utica region, into the gas-rich lands that are considered to fall within the Marcellus region.

    Forced Grouping is a something of a variation of eminent domain, wherein land owners who have not signed a deal to lease their gas rights are compelled to accept the deal given to a majority of their neighbors.  The underlying reasoning is simple:  Natural Gas is not segmented by the above-ground property line.  This means "hold-outs" can effectively hijack economically useful and beneficial production on an entire deposit, absent some provision such as forced grouping.

    Setting aside discussion of individual property rights vs the needs of society for the purposes of this one article, as a tangible matter the "fairness" of such compulsory grouping largely depends on the terms of the leasing agreements entered into by the majority of area landowners. 

    The arguments for forced grouping revolve around the economics of energy, fostering and encouraging production and keeping prices down for the ultimate end-user.  However, JHI believes that for the anticipated Marcellus Shale boom to be fully realized, the land owners who hold the rights to the gas beneath their feet must be full participants in such a boom.

    If it becomes law as presently drafted, this owner-friendly legislation will add greater credibility to gas producers/ lessees arguing in favor of the enforcement of forced grouping.

    While some folks are "hold-outs" for other reasons, in economic terms such might not necessarily be bad news for land owners who hold the rights to Marcellus Shale natural gas.  If you are such an owner, know your rights.  Gas producers/ lessees have top-shelf attorneys dedicated to pursuing the interests of these companies.  You should have a high quality lawyer guarding your rights and interests.

    In light of this new legislation, talk with your neighbors about a common strategy for moving forward.  JHI will continue to track developments in Pennsylvania law impacting the increasingly controversial and complex issues surrounding Marcellus Shale natural gas exploitation.